Thursday, 12 May 2016

Opticron Event at Lockley Lodge

Gary and Chrissy at Lockley Lodge have asked us to advertise an Opticron Open Day at Lockley Lodge next Tuesday.  There will be opportunities to look at (and through) a wide range of first class Opticron optical equipment - telescopes and binoculars,.

If you in the market for new kit it may be a good time to get down there.  There may even be some bargains!





Monday, 9 May 2016

An old picture in the archives

there are now over 600 pictures in the People's Collection of Wales archives and we have been busy updating the captions and making corrections but please have a look at them and comment if you see anything wrong.

Mike Alexander, a past Skomer warden, recently came across this picture in the Pembrokeshire Archives. We believe it is Captain Vaughan Palmer Davies (1826-1914),  with the big white beard, patting the red deer calf outside the Skokholm cottage and the picture was probably taken in 1889 .  The Captain who was the tenant of Skomer Island from 1861 to 1892 also rented Skokholm for grazing.  The deer calf was a bit of a surprise.

There is a good summary of the Skomer history on http://www.welshwildlife.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/History-of-Skomer-including-timeline.pdf   which is worth a read if you haven't looked at it before.

In recent months many new (old) pictures of Skokholm have emerged including ones taken in 1948 showing the old railway track going right down to the jetty at which time there was no wall alongside the track and some from 1954 showing the same views.  By 1954 Trinity House had  put a three wheel dumper type truck onto the island and had built the current wall all the way up the track - and also probably dumped that load of concrete over the cliff into the cave below the track.  these pictures will be on the People's Collection shortly.

Monday, 29 February 2016

Wardens Back

Yesterday in almost perfect conditions the Skokholm wardens  returned. 

With the help of John Reynolds and the Dale Princess  from Neyland with an occasional Guillemot, Razorbill and Kittiwake seen on the passage it only took ten minutes or so to unload the boat and we could head up to the buildings for a quick condition check.  There was no damage anywhere and inside almost no signs of mould or damp damage - amazing after this stormy wet winter.  The dumper started almost immediately, although looking quite sad,  and Richard & Giselle were very happy indeed to be back on the island and looking forward to their four weeks of relative isolation.  No doubt the blog will start again as soon as they sort out their internet connection.  Helpers included Liz Thompson (formerly Gynn) who was warden exactly 35 years ago.